Remembering the Blizzard of 1993

Winter storm

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (WIAT) — Winter weather has made its way into Alabama on numerous occasions over the course of the past three weeks, which is something rather uncommon for the state.

Monday night and Tuesday’s winter weather event saw snowfall in numerous portions of Alabama only two weeks after snow crippled much of the state.

So how does Alabama’s recent winter weather stack up against other snow storms in Alabama?

According to statistics provided by the National Weather Service, 2014’s January and February snowfall totals don’t quite measure up to Alabama records in some cities.

Anniston

  • January record: 10 inches of snow in 1904
  • February record: 4.5 inches of snow in 1998

Birmingham

  • January record: 11.8 inches of snow in 1936
  • February record: 5 inches of snow in 1902

Tuscaloosa

  • January record: 4 inches of snow in 1977
  • February record: 7 inches of snow in 1960

While the snow and ice of January and February this year had a major impact on so many people across the state of Alabama, it doesn’t measure up in terms of snowfall to other storms in years past.

Most notably, the Blizzard of 1993, which is sometimes referred to as the “storm of the century.” The March storm dropped 13 inches of snow in Anniston, Birmingham and Talladega.

What made the Blizzard of 1993 even crazier was the drastic difference in temperatures in Alabama over a mere three-day period.

According to the office of the state climatologist, temperatures across the state were in the 70s on March 11, 1993.

When the winter weather hit on March 13, 1993, temperatures were not nearly as comfortable.

Anniston

  • High on March 11, 1993: 74 degrees
  • Low on March 14, 1993: 12 degrees

Birmingham

  • High on March 11, 1993: 75 degrees
  • Low on March 14, 1993: 2 degrees

Tuscaloosa

  • High on March 11, 1993: 76 degrees
  • Low on March 14, 1993: 12 degrees

The National Weather Service says every square inch of the state received some snowfall during the storm, which spread as far south as Jacksonville, Florida, and as far north as Canada. Even Mobile, Alabama, received three inches of snow.

So as the next round of winter weather makes its way into the area Wednesday, be sure to heed caution. While nowhere near the amounts that fell in 1993 are predicted for Wednesday, what does fall will likely cause for treacherous driving conditions.

Stay off the roads if at all possible, and if you do have to venture out, make sure your car is filled up with gas. Take along a few blankets, a pillow, some toiletries, food, water and an extra pair of clothing or two.

CBS42’s Chief Meteorologist Gene Norman and the rest of the CBS42 Weather Team have been hard at work detailing what the next threat of winter weather means for the area.

For more on the forecast for the rest of the week, including Wednesday’s winter weather threat, click here.

For an updated list of schools closings, delays and early dismissals, click here.

2014 WIAT-TV CBS42

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